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  • YAYOI KUSAMA 6 PANEL CAP | WHITE

YAYOI KUSAMA 6 PANEL CAP | WHITE

80.00
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YAYOI KUSAMA 6 PANEL CAP | WHITE

80.00
  • This XLARGE® JAPAN cap made from a cotton-twill design is embroidered with a the XLARGE® Standard logo and Yayoi Kusama’s signature. The precision panelling and the adjustable tab at the back ensures a perfect fit. It is a structured cap with a flat visor that has the ability to curve, has a full crown, and six panels.
  • One Size (Head Circumference: 58.5cm)
  • 100% Cotton
  • Product Number: 01171033

XLARGE® JAPAN × YAYOI KUSAMA CAPSULE COLLECTION

  • For Yayoi Kusama’s most recent “My Eternal Soul” exhibition held at the National Art Exhibition Room, Roppongi, Tokyo, from the 22nd February - 22nd May 2017, XLARGE® JAPAN has collaborated with YAYOI KUSAMA on a limited edition capsule collection.
  • This exclusive capsule collection pays tribute to her “Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968”exhibition, the first in-depth display of her work, organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Japan Foundation in collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art, which opened at The Museum of Modern Art on July 9, 1998. The “Love Forever” exhibition focused on the full scope of the artist's activities during the years she lived and worked in New York.
  • Her work combines elements of expressionism, minimalism, surrealism and pop art. As a young woman, Kusama was diagnosed with an obsessive-compulsive disorder, and since 1977 she has chosen to live in a psychiatric institution in Tokyo. Her obsession with veils of nets and dots stemmed, in her opinion, from a recurring childhood hallucination. As she recounted in 1975, "One day I was looking at the red flower patterns of the tablecloth on a table, and when I looked up I saw the same pattern covering the ceiling, the windows and the walls, and finally all over the room, my body and the universe. I felt as if I had begun to self- obliterate, to revolve in the infinity of endless time and the absoluteness of space, and be reduced to nothingness."
  • When Kusama returned to Japan in the 1970s, she left a legacy that affected her own generation and resonates today and it is no exaggeration to say that Kusama has influenced the direction of American art more than any other post-war Japanese artist.
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  • This XLARGE® JAPAN cap made from a cotton-twill design is embroidered with a the XLARGE® Standard logo and Yayoi Kusama’s signature. The precision panelling and the adjustable tab at the back ensures a perfect fit. It is a structured cap with a flat visor that has the ability to curve, has a full crown, and six panels.
  • One Size (Head Circumference: 58.5cm)
  • 100% Cotton
  • Product Number: 01171033

XLARGE® JAPAN × YAYOI KUSAMA CAPSULE COLLECTION

  • For Yayoi Kusama’s most recent “My Eternal Soul” exhibition held at the National Art Exhibition Room, Roppongi, Tokyo, from the 22nd February - 22nd May 2017, XLARGE® JAPAN has collaborated with YAYOI KUSAMA on a limited edition capsule collection.
  • This exclusive capsule collection pays tribute to her “Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968”exhibition, the first in-depth display of her work, organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Japan Foundation in collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art, which opened at The Museum of Modern Art on July 9, 1998. The “Love Forever” exhibition focused on the full scope of the artist's activities during the years she lived and worked in New York.
  • Her work combines elements of expressionism, minimalism, surrealism and pop art. As a young woman, Kusama was diagnosed with an obsessive-compulsive disorder, and since 1977 she has chosen to live in a psychiatric institution in Tokyo. Her obsession with veils of nets and dots stemmed, in her opinion, from a recurring childhood hallucination. As she recounted in 1975, "One day I was looking at the red flower patterns of the tablecloth on a table, and when I looked up I saw the same pattern covering the ceiling, the windows and the walls, and finally all over the room, my body and the universe. I felt as if I had begun to self- obliterate, to revolve in the infinity of endless time and the absoluteness of space, and be reduced to nothingness."
  • When Kusama returned to Japan in the 1970s, she left a legacy that affected her own generation and resonates today and it is no exaggeration to say that Kusama has influenced the direction of American art more than any other post-war Japanese artist.